CA bill would allow cannabis producers to sell at farmers’ markets

GULSN:TA CANNABIS CROPS IN CALIFORNIA FARMER MARKETS. THE CLDOU DRAFT LEGISLATION WILL SOON MAKE THIS A REALITY. AB 2691 JUST PASSED THE ASSEMBLY BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONS COMMITTEE THIS WEEK. ANDR: EA KCRA 3’S ORKO MANNA BREAK DOWN THE NEW BILL, BUT ALSO EXPLAINS WHY NOT EVERYONE IS ON BOARD. REPORTER: AT DAVIS FARMERS’ MARKET, FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES ARE ON DISPLAY LLFU. THIS IS WHAT YOU WILL EXPECT TO SEE, BUT PROPOSED LEGISLATION PASSING THROUGH CALIFORNIA STATE LAW WANTS AOLS TO ALLOW CANNABIS GROWERS TO SELL POT PRODUCTS DIRECTLY AT LICENSED EVENTS, LIKE FARMERS MARKS .AND >> I THINK IT’S SUPER, SUPER AWESOME AND I LOVE THAT THEY KIND OF GET RID OF THAT GUILT OR DARK CLOUD THAT THEY HAVE AROUND THE ENTIRE WEED INDUSTRY. REPORTER: IN A STATEMENT TO KCRA3, BILL DEMOCRATIC ASSEMBLYMBER SPONSOR JIM WOOD SAYS, IN PART, THAT THE PURPOSE OF AB 2-6-9-1 IS TO HELP LEGAL CANNABIS GROWERS WHO GROW LESS ‘AN ACRE OF CANNABIS TO ACHIEVE CONSUMER RECOGNITION FOR THEIR UNIQUE PRODUCTS, JUST AS IT HAS BEEN DONE FOR ARTISANAL, ARTISANAL WINE AND OTHER AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS FROM THE FAMILY FARM. >> THERE IS LOTS OF COMPETITION FOR SHELF SPACE AND FOR SMALL BATCH PRODUCERS. REPORTER: IN SUPPOROFT AB IS 2691 GENINE COLEMAN – EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF ORIGINS COUNCIL AN ADVOCACY ORGANIZATION REPRESENTING NINE HUNDRED RURAL CANNABIS GROWERS IN CALIFORNIA. >> THE LARGE MAJORITY OF THEM PRODUCE HALF ACRE OR LESS OF CANNABIS. REPORTER: WHILE SOME ARE EXCITED BY LEGISLATION — >> I THINK IT’S GOING BAE REAL MIXED BAG. JOURNALIST: THE OTHERS DON’T HEAR. RANDII MACNEAR, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF DAVIS FARMERS MARKET ALLIANCE, TELLS ME SHE OVERSEES A FOOD COMPANY – AND IT WILL LIKELY BE ST TAYHAT WAY. >> WE ARE REALLY INTERESTED IN SELLING FOOD, SO AT THIS POINT, CANNABIS IS NOT FO. WE ARE TRYING TO INCREASE OUR LOCAL FARMERS, WE ARE TRYING TO GET NEW EMERGING FARMERS FROM YOLO COUYNT HERE AND GIVE THEM SPACE TO SELL, SO I THINK WE WOULD LIKELY CONTINUE WITH THIS CONCENTRATI ON REPORTER: MACNEAR ADDS THAT THE DECISION ALSO RESTS WITH DAVIS CITY COUNCIL. IL >> I’M SURE YOU WILL SEE SOME OF THIS PRODUCT IN OTHER MARKETS, BUT NOT HERE AT DAVIS. REPORTER: THE BILL HAS STILL GO THROUGH MORE COMMITTEE HEARINGS, THROUGH THE ASSEMBLY AND THE SENATE, BEFORE IT POTENTIALLY HEADS TO THE GOVERNOR’S OFFICE. REPORTS TO DAVIS, ORKO MANNA, KCRA 3EWS. ANDREA:UST TO J SHOW WHAT CANNABIS HAS COME TO CALIFORNIA.NI FOR THE FIRST TIME THE CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR WILL HOST A CANNABIS CONTEST THIS YEAR. THIS WILL NOT INVOLVE CANNABIS USE BUT REGISTRATIONS WILL BE NOTED

California bill would allow cannabis producers to sell products at farmers’ markets

Proposed legislation could soon allow cannabis growers to sell pot products at permitted events in California, such as farmers’ markets. Assembly Bill 2691 was passed by the Assembly’s Business and Professions Committee on Tuesday. The sponsor of the bill, Assm. Jim Wood, D-Santa Rosa, sent KCRA 3 the following statement: “It’s no secret that cannabis businesses across the state are in trouble, whether it’s taxes, costs of compliance, competition with the illicit market, or other challenges, but the goal of AB 2691 is to help legal cannabis growers who grow less than one acre of cannabis gain consumer recognition for their unique products, just as has been done for craft beer, craft wine and other agricultural products from the family farm. Giving these small farmers opportunities at locally approved events to expose the public to their products increases the consumer choice and gives farmers a better chance of reaching retail shelves, which is their ultimate goal. This is not to circumvent retailers, but to grow the industry as a whole. My office has always summer open to those who may have concerns about this bill and I am here to listen to their concerns and their proposed solutions. Origins Council is an advocacy organization that represents historic rural cannabis growing areas across California. They have about 900 members. “The vast majority of them produce half an acre or less of cannabis, so that’s definitely a huge potential opportunity for our members,” Coleman said. “For small producers, direct marketing and selling opportunities with consumers is really critical. “While some are excited about the legislation, others are not interested. Davis Farmers Market Alliance executive director Randii MacNear said she oversees what she describes as a “food business” and even if the legislation is passed, the Davis Farmers Market will likely remain as it is. “We’re really interested in selling food, so at this point cannabis is not food,” MacNear said. “We’re trying to increase the number of our local farmers. We’re trying to get new, emerging Yolo County farmers here and give them space to sell, so I think we’ll probably stick to that focus.” MacNear added that the decision also rests with the Davis City Council. “I’m sure you’ll see some of these products in other markets, but not here in Davis,” MacNear said. Still, some community members said the new bill was another way to normalize cannabis. “I think it’s super, super awesome and I love that they kind of get rid of that guilt or that dark cloud that they have around the whole weed industry,” said Davis resident Crystal Molina. According to the California Legislature website, AB 2691 is now directed to the Assembly Appropriations Committee. It would then have to go through the entire Assembly and the entire Senate, before reaching the governor’s office. small urban and rural independent producers, according to an analysis by the Assembly’s Policy Committee on the bill. Opponents of the bill, including the United Cannabis Business Association, have said the bill would violate Proposition 64, which was passed in 2016. Those against the bill also argue that it would only expand not market access, proponents have said.

Proposed legislation could soon allow cannabis cultivators to sell pot products at licensed events in California, such as farmers’ markets.

Assembly Bill 2691 was passed by the Assembly’s Business and Professions Committee on Tuesday. The sponsor of the bill, Assm. Jim Wood, D-Santa Rosa, sent KCRA 3 the following statement:

“It’s no secret that cannabis businesses across the state are struggling, whether it’s taxes, compliance costs, competing with the illicit market, or other challenges, but the purpose of AB 2691 is to assist legal cannabis growers growing less than 1 acre of cannabis. achieve consumer recognition for their unique products, just as it has been done for craft beer, craft wine and other agricultural products from the family farm. Giving these small farmers opportunities at locally approved events to expose the public to their products increases consumer choice and gives farmers a better chance of reaching retail shelves, which is their ultimate goal. It’s not about bypassing retailers, it’s about growing the industry as a whole. My office has always been open to those who may have concerns about this bill and I am here to listen to their concerns and their proposed solutions.

Genine Coleman, executive director of the Origins Council, said she supports the bill. Origins Council is an advocacy organization that represents historic rural cannabis growing areas across California. They have about 900 members.

“The vast majority of them produce half an acre or less of cannabis, so that’s definitely a huge potential opportunity for our members,” Coleman said. “For small producers, having direct marketing and sales opportunities with consumers is really essential.”

While some are excited about the legislation, others are not interested. Davis Farmers Market Alliance executive director Randii MacNear said she oversees what she describes as a “food business”, and even if the legislation is passed, the Davis Farmers Market will likely remain as it is.

“We’re really interested in selling food, so at this point cannabis is not food,” MacNear said. “We’re trying to increase the number of our local farmers. We’re trying to bring new emerging farmers here from Yolo County and give them space to sell, so I think we’ll probably stick to that focus.”

MacNear added that the decision also rests with the Davis City Council.

“I’m sure you’ll see some of these products in other markets, but not here in Davis,” MacNear said.

Still, some community members said the new bill was another way to normalize cannabis.

“I think it’s super, super awesome and I love that they kind of get rid of that guilt or that dark cloud that they have around the whole weed industry,” said Davis resident Crystal Molina.

According to the California Legislature’s website, AB 2691 is now directed to the Assembly Appropriations Committee. It would then have to go through the entire Assembly and Senate before reaching the governor’s office.

Proponents of the bill argue that the bill would help producers connect directly with consumers, explaining that the state’s current framework makes it difficult to do so for nearly all small urban and rural independent producers, according to an analysis by the Assembly Bill Policy Committee.

Opponents of the bill, including the United Cannabis Business Association, have said the bill would violate Proposition 64, which was passed in 2016. Those against the bill also argue that it would only expand not market access, proponents have said.

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