“Ozark:” Too little, too late

The beauty of television lies in its ability to create worlds in which anything is possible. Free from the burdensome constraints of reality, ever advancing in its campaign to keep people in what society would consider “their place”; writers, directors and television producers have the ability to let us see what it would be like if the underprivileged were allowed to reach the top and live long enough to enjoy it once they got there. But they rarely, if ever, do. And the “ozark“The series finale is a prime example of how, every time that opportunity is missed, it feels like a little heartache. Or, in the case of Ruth Langmore (Julia Garner), a bullet to the chest.

In the penultimate episode of the series, we saw Ruth dodge death when Nelson (Nelson Bonilla) gets killed before he has a chance to kill her or her friend and business partner, Rachel ( Jordana Spiro). This isn’t the first time Ruth has thwarted being on the sharp end of a bullet, but it will be the last.

At the start of the finale, we see her going back and forth between two versions of reality; the one she is currently in, burying Nelson’s body at the bottom of what would have been her swimming pool; and the one she had with her family, and would still have had she never mixed with Marty (Jason Bateman) and Wendy (Laura Linney) Byrde.

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Ruth is closer than she has ever been to happiness, but desperately sad because she can feel it will be snatched away from her when the money and influence she fought like hell for is gone. will reveal too little, too late.

Throughout the episode, Ruth communes with the essence of her deceased cousin, Wyatt, whom she wishes she could share all of this with while knowing, deep down, that he is better off where he is and that she will be there to meet him soon. With each layer of concrete poured and each foundation laid for her new lakeside home, a look of melancholy washes over Ruth’s eyes like clouds passing over the face of the sun. She smiles at what she has, knowing that she really has nothing. She’s closer than she’s ever been to happiness, but desperately sad because she can feel it will be snatched from her when the money and influence she’s fought like hell for comes to an end. will reveal too little, too late.


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Ruth has spent her whole life caring for people like the Byrdes, happy to make do with the crumbs they drop that she has felt lucky to be able to pick up and skim, just by being near them. She got herself into this mess doing favors for Marty and Wendy, and she’s spending the last full day of her life on earth doing even more.

The Byrde family in “Ozark” (Courtesy of Netflix)After solving one problem by disposing of Nelson’s body, Ruth immediately gave another when Marty shows up and threatens him with an ultimatum. If Ruth doesn’t help convince Charlotte (Sofia Hublitz) and Jonah (Skylar Gaertner) to stay, Marty will tell Camila (Verónica Falcón) that she’s responsible for the death of her son Javi (Alfonso Herrera).

“Is it you, or Wendy?” Ruth asks, somewhat surprised that the man she can’t help but trust is putting his life on the line like this.

In response, Marty nods to himself without a word before getting in the car and driving off. Almost like he couldn’t bear to fully vocalize his betrayal, or that he was still going so far down a line to protect his wife, even after all she’s done.

Ruth does as asked, taking a gun and a bottle of booze to Wendy’s dad’s motel room, and endures his tactless monologue about her own daughter being a slut before tackling the subject under study.

“How about fucking her?” Nathan (Richard Thomas) talks about his daughter when Ruth asks him why he wants to take his children away from her so badly. Once the truth is revealed, she makes him say it again in front of Charlotte and Jonah, which is effective in making them decide not to leave, for now.

With the children back, the Byrde family goes to the mental hospital to get mum Byrde out and she cries at the sight of her brood, even though she was, bags in hand, about to leave them all in the dirt a few days before.

“I want you to stay so much it hurts my teeth,” Wendy tells Charlotte and Jonah.

Laura Linney is a fantastic actress, so her portrayal of Wendy makes it almost impossible to tell if there’s ever any real truth behind the words she says. In this moment, reunited with her children, I found myself feeling for her, but while keeping a stinky eye. Like how my dog ​​measures other dogs that come to the park.

“I’m not saying I love you unconditionally, but we’ve been through a multitude of conditions and I’m still here,” Marty tells Wendy in their minibus on the way home. What a jerk.

In what appears to be a rather pointless twist first shown at the start of this season, Marty swerves to avoid an oncoming tractor-trailer, and their family vehicle flips over in what appears to be a fatal accident, but everyone leaves with barely a scratch.

Father Benitez (Bruno Bichir), waiting in their driveway when they drive home to tell them that Navarro wants to talk to them, hears about the accident from Wendy and says, “How many times does God have to point the finger at you before that you didn’t notice?”

Wendy laughs it off, saying what she takes away from the accident is that God is telling her family that they will make it out alive. In the world of “Ozark”, it seems that even God favors the rich. Wait, that’s the case in real life too, or so it often seems.

The Byrdes meet Navarro in prison and he tells them that he thinks Camila is the one who hit him, and that she is probably responsible for Nelson’s disappearance as well. Marty and Wendy don’t need Navarro’s help or protection anymore at this point, so as long as he doesn’t blow anything on them, they really don’t care. When we later see him shot by a guard during a staged “escape”, it’s hard for the viewer to care either. This plot point was executed to death, and at this point, with only a short amount of time left on the episode, most people are occupied with thoughts of Ruth, and what, if anything, the Byrdes will do to help him.

At the big donor ceremony on Belle, Marty, Wendy, Charlotte, Jonah, and Ruth are all dressed in their finery, which in this context makes it look like they’re dressed for a funeral.

At the big donor ceremony on Belle, Marty, Wendy, Charlotte, Jonah, and Ruth are all dressed in their finery, which in this context makes it look like they’re dressed for a funeral.

Alcohol flows freely, money changes hands and everyone is almost free and clear. But then Camila presses Wendy, Marty, and Clare (Katrina Lenk) for more information on the day Javi died, and Clare chokes up and drops Ruth’s name.

His death is worthy, at least we are given that.

“I’m not sorry. Your son was a murderous bitch. And now I know where he got that from,” Ruth tells Camila, who emerges from the darkness outside her house to do the work herself.

“I’m not sorry. Your son was a murderous bitch. And now I know where he got that from,” Ruth tells Camila, who emerges from the darkness outside her house to do the work herself.

There is a long pause as Camila cruelly holds Ruth in anticipation.

“Well, are you gonna do this shit or what?!?” Ruth screams, and these are her last words ever spoken.

As Ruth bleeds in the mud, the Byrdes are about to give speeches about Beauty to extract as much money as possible from donors to their foundation. At the end of the night, they go home and pour each other drinks, which they sip in silence on either side of the kitchen. Wendy notices broken glass in their sliding door and we see Mel Sattem (Adam Rothenberg) outside holding the cookie jar containing Ben’s ashes.

An exchange takes place. Other threats are made. And then Jonah appears with a gun, the screen goes black and there’s a bang.

We’re supposed to be wondering, at this point, if Jonah shot Mel or turned that gun on his parents so he could finally, honestly, be free. But for me, I didn’t care one way or another. For me, that final ended the minute Ruth hit the ground.

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